KS3 Curriculum Guide

 

INTRODUCTION

EngineeringWelcome to the science area of the Sweyne Park School website. We hope that you will find the material covered in these pages useful and encourage you to contact us if you need any further information on a science education related issue. In the first instance please contact the Science curriculum leader, Kat Curtis.

COURSE DETAILS

Pupils are taught science topics three times a week and will cover Biology, Chemistry and Physics in each year of study. In addition to the theoretical concepts our pupils are required to develop their practical skills of planning, safely carrying out and evaluating their own scientific investigations.

Assessment

A wide variety of assessment takes place within the science department.  Students can expect to have three formal assessments throughout the year, with smaller assessments, end of topic tests and pupil guided self-assessment in between these. We know that children are motivated to learn when they are fully aware of where they are and what they need to do next to move up through the levels in both theory and practical skills.

 


Home Learning

Students will receive approximately 1 hour of home learning each week. The tasks set follow the curriculum and are designed to consolidate knowledge, practising key skills and provide opportunity for students to be creative and imaginative within their science study. Each home learning task will be accessible via the VLE and support for home learning is provided each week on Wednesdays, Sc3, 3-4pm.


SimulatorYear 7 Science

The initial focus in Year 7 is for pupils to develop their practical skills in science; working through a booklet of experiments and investigations, students begin to develop predictions, identify variables, write basic methods, assess the risks of the activity and construct conclusions. The later study of topics such as solutions and forces provide several opportunities for students to return to and perfect these core skills underlying the scientific process. Study of forces also introduces students to mathematical concepts in science, using equations and representing data in a line graph. Throughout the year, students familiarise themselves with more specialised scientific equipment, one example being the use of microscopes to study cells. Students will begin to explore the use of models to explain scientific ideas whilst studying fundamental ideas in chemistry such as atoms, elements, compounds and mixtures. Pupils will be asked to demonstrate their understanding using a given model and some may begin to develop their own. The use of scientific terminology significantly increases between Year 6 and Year 7 therefore there is a focus on retention and use of the new keywords across all topics. Further to this, studies on reproduction and the environment provide pupils the opportunity to develop their extended writing skills, focusing on describing and explaining using the correct terminology. 

Time table of Topics

 

Skills

Cells

Atoms & Elements

Forces: Speed and contact forces

Reproduction

Compounds

Space

Particles

Ecological Relationships 1

Mixtures & Solutions

Energy

 

 

Year 8 Science

In Year 8, pupils continue to develop their practical skills across a broad range of topics including heating and cooling and acids and alkalis, where students work increasingly independently to create their own hypotheses, identify variables, write a clear methods and assess the risks of the activity. Whilst studying topics such as forces and sound, students apply more sophisticated mathematical concepts to science, learning how to confidently re-arrange equations. There is greater focus on constructing a line graph independently and using the line of best fit to explain more complex patterns in the data. We also introduce concept of error in practical investigations and encourage students to consider these ideas in their evaluations. Exploring the use of models to explain scientific ideas will feature notably in more abstract topics like rocks and magnets. Pupils will be asked to consider the strengths and limitation of existing models before they are encouraged to create their own.  They further develop a broad range of scientific terminology, and, through studies on organ systems and ecological relationships, pupils develop their extended writing skills, focusing on organising information into a logical sequence.

Time table of Topics

Sound

Heating & Cooling

Microbes &
microscopes

Acids & Alkalis

Light

Biological
Systems

Earth &
Resources

Biological Systems continued.

Forces: Gravity and
Pressure

Ecological
Relationships 2

Magnets &
Electromagnets 

 

PlanetsYear 9 Science

In Year 9, pupils continue to develop their practical skills across a broad range of topics including forces and chemical reactions, where students work independently create their own hypotheses, identify variables, write a clear methods and assess the risks of the activity.
Whilst studying topics such as velocity, students apply more sophisticated mathematical concepts to science, learning how to confidently re-arrange equations. There is greater focus on graph gradients during results analysis and on accuracy, repeatability and validity of investigations in evaluations.
Exploring the use of models to explain scientific ideas will feature notably in more abstract topics like electricity. Pupils are encouraged to develop their own models as well as considering the strengths and limitations of those given to them.  They also develop a broad range of scientific terminology, develop their writing skills and, through studies on health and human biology, pupils develop the ability to present reasoned arguments that consider social, ethical and economic factors.

Time table of Topics

Human Biology 
Electricity 

Evolution 
Forces: Levers and terminal velocity

Plant biology
Climate 

Chemical Reactions

Students begin GCSE

 

Racing Car